Centuries Of Wonder – Gone!

Stonehenge Amazing, Maybe Not So.

This man has figured out something that has confounded scholars for centuries. Not only figured it out, but demonstrates it. The building of Stonehenge!

He actually builds a replica of Stonehenge single handedly while a committee of 20 or 30 Civil Engineering professors from leading universities were debating how it might be done.

You have got to see this — One man with a brain to do and not just talk about it….. click on this website:

http://j-walkblog.com/index.php?/weblog/posts/moving_big_rocks/

UpLifts – Right Of Passage

Right Of Passage

Well, we’ve reached that time of the year when some of our beloved and wonderful young people are enjoying that right of passage that we call ‘high school graduation.’ Well, I have something of a parable.

Many years ago when I was a brash young high school student, I remember that I was given the choice between two classes: The one was ‘typing,’ or ‘keyboarding’ as I think they call it now, and the other was something else, I don’t remember. At the time I think my reasoning went something like this: “Typing — that’s girls’ stuff! What in the world do I need that for? Not me, man, I’m not taking typing. Give me ‘wood shop’ or something.” I never learned to type, at all — never had a single lesson. You know, I really at the time never thought I’d need it.

Now, I know that the Lord has a sense of humor, and I’m sure He’s chuckled more than once watching me fumble through research papers and compositions in the wee hours of the morning with my pathetic ‘hunt and peck’ system of typing. I tried — I really tried to master that keyboard doing it ‘my way.’ Heaven knows with a dozen years of college now, I’ve had enough practice. Oh sure, I could go fast. I could sound like a hailstorm on a patio roof, but — but when it was finished, I dare you to read it.

I’m here to tell you, ‘if you want to be a good typer, you gotta do it the way they tell ya.’ Now, it may sound silly, but that one foolish inconsequential decision has cost me more time, and more frustration than you can imagine.

Well, I have made the correct decision, I decided to learn the correct way to type. My 13 year-old daughter — sat down with me and said something like this, “Okay Dad, these fingers go here, and these go here. These fingers cover these keys, and these cover those. Got it, Dad? — Good.”

Simple, right? — Not on your life! You think I could get those fingers to go where they were supposed to? — Not a chance! It was like herding ten pre-school children through a fun house maze. And my little fingers, they were the worst. It was like they were a part of my body, but not connected to the same nervous system. I mean, think about it: How in the world are you supposed to concentrate on ten different things all at the same time? It has been one of the most frustrating physical things I have ever done, as to try to ‘retrain’ — get that — ‘retrain’ these scared old hands. Trying to unlearn, my dear friends, the effects of a bad decision is many times more difficult than to have learned it right the first time.

Now, let me add this: Since that lesson from my daughter in January, I have experienced that wonderful phenomenon of a ‘proper conditioned response.’ I still need a lot of work, but now I can look at a word, and automatically, at least most of the time, the right finger will land on the right key at the right time, and I don’t have to think about it. Ooh, that feels good too!

My young friends, you’re graduating. Your decisions in the next few years will in large measure determine the course of your entire life. Make them wisely, make them very carefully, but most importantly — make them the Lord’s way. If you form the right habits now, the manuscript you write of your life will be an epic adventure that you, the Lord, and your children will enjoy for centuries to come.

I close with these words from Ralph Waldo Emerson:

So nigh is grandeur to our dust,

So near is God to man,

When duty whispers low, Thou must,

The youth replies, I can!

UpLifts – The Hearts of the Children

The Hearts of the Children

Memorial Day was established to cause us to remember and honor those who have gone before us.

After the Civil War, there were those who wanted to remember and honor fallen Union soldiers. Eventually that sentiment expanded to include all those who had died in any war. And today Memorial Day is a national holiday where we remember all those that we have loved and lost.

Personally, when I visit family graves, my memory is renewed with love for them, even those I didn’t know. And for those I did know, life’s experiences with them return. Their hallowed graves touch this child’s heart and turn it to his father’s each time I go.

So in this Spirit of this past Memorial Day, may I share something with you that you may not have considered before?

We are the children of the Prophets, and I promise you it matters a great deal to our ancient fathers that we do not forget them and their legacy.

Now, there were many, but I’ll mention just a few. Some 700 years before Christ, the Great Isaiah was killed for his testimony of the Messiah. He died a martyr — a witness. Then Peter, the Savior’s chief apostle, was crucified upside down, also for being of Christ. James was run through with a sword. Paul was beheaded. Nearly all of the Savior’s apostles died violent deaths for their witness of Christ. They gave their lives, effectively sealing, making permanent, their testimonies for all time. (Hebrews 9:16-17)

My friends, the single greatest expression of testimony is for the witness to voluntarily give his life for it.

Please, now, in light of what I’ve said, think about the Savior’s words through Malachi: “Behold I will send you Elijah the Prophet before the coming of the great and dreadful day of the Lord; and he shall turn the hearts of the fathers to the children and the hearts of the children to their Fathers, lest I come and smite the earth with a curse.” (Malachi 4:5-6)

Memorial Day originated to honor those slain for freedom. Well, what of those slain for the word of the Lord? I can’t go to the graves of the ancient ones, but I can go to their testimonies. The Holy Scriptures cost the lives of the best men of their times. Therefore, it behooves us as grateful children that we turn our hearts to our prophet Fathers with a greater reverence for the written memorial they left us. And when we do, we will be led to Him who will bring life again to all men.

By Glenn Rawson — May 2007

UpLifts – Kind Words and Love

UpLifts

When filled with God’s love, we can do and see and understand things that we could not otherwise do or see or understand. Filled with His love, we can endure pain, quell fear, forgive freely, avoid contention, renew strength, and bless and help others in ways surprising even to us. — John H. Groberg

Love spends his all, and still hath store. — P. J. Bailey

If there is anything better than to be loved, it is loving. — Someone Special

Caring lifts the burden… courage shoulders the weight… but only love lightens the load. — Lloyd John Ogilvie

In the eyes of a child, Love is spelled “TIME.” — G.P. Howe

Kind Words

You know, sometimes it’s not what you say to people; it’s how you say it. When Jerry was just a teenager he got into an argument one day with his father. Well, that night as he sat in his room sulking, his mother came down to talk to him. As they talked, Jerry realized he had judged his father wrongly and that he had acted inappropriately. His mother suggested he apologize. Jerry promised to do so the next morning at breakfast, but when he went down for breakfast, his father was not there nor would he be ever again. He had left early that morning to supervise an airdrop in the Alaskan wilderness. His plane flew into a mountain — and Jerry’s father was killed.

For the next few years, Jerry struggled with a terrible burden of guilt — his last moments with his father, and he had wasted them on a selfish tantrum. He could not forgive himself.

Then one day in a church meeting, he listened to a speaker teach him about love, especially that precious love between parents and children. The speaker encouraged the audience to express that love. Well, it was too much for Jerry. He broke down and began to sob. As the people filed out of the chapel, Jerry was left alone. His sobs became an uncontrollable torrent of emotion, until even his hands and feet became numb. One by one his closest friends came back in the room and spoke words of encouragement to him, but it did no good. There was too much pain and too much guilt over too many years.

Then Jerry became aware of arms encircling his shoulders, and a warm cheek pressed gently against his own. He was pulled into a warm and loving embrace. Kind words softly spoken in his ear penetrated his grief and gradually eased away the pain. He opened his eyes — and looked into the loving face of the speaker who had taught of the power of love, Spencer W. Kimball.

You know, Jerry has long since forgotten the words that were spoken that day, but of the warmth of that embrace and the sincerity of that love, he will never forget.

Adapted by Glenn Rawson — March 1998

The Brick

THE BRICK

A young and successful executive was traveling down a neighborhood street, going a bit too fast in his shinny new Jaguar. He was watching for kids darting out from between parked cars and slowed down.

When he thought he saw something. As his car passed, no children appeared. instead, a brick smashed into the Jag’s right side door! He slammed on the brakes and backed the Jag to the spot where the brick had been thrown.

The angry driver then jumped out of the car, grabbed the kid and pushed him up against a parked car shouting, “What was that all about and who are you? Just what the heck are you doing? That’s a new car and that brick you threw is going to cost a lot of money. Why did you do it?”

The young boy was apologetic. “Please, mister… please, I’m sorry but I didn’t know what else to do,” He pleaded. “I threw the brick because no one else would stop…” With tears dripping down his face and off his chin, the youth pointed to a spot just around a parked car. “It’s my brother, “he said. “He rolled off the curb and fell out of his wheelchair and I can’t lift him up.”

Now sobbing, the boy asked the stunned executive, “Would you please help me get him back into his wheelchair? He’s hurt and he’s too heavy for me.”

Moved beyond words, the driver tried to swallow the rapidly swelling lump in his throat. He hurriedly lifted the handicapped boy back into the wheelchair, then took out a linen handkerchief and dabbed at the fresh scrapes and cuts. A quick look told him everything was going to be okay.

“Thank you and may God bless you,” the grateful child told the stranger.

Too shook up for words, the man simply watched the boy push his wheelchair-bound brother down the sidewalk toward their home.

It was a long, slow walk back to the Jag. The damage was very noticeable, but the driver never bothered to repair the dented side door. He kept the dent there to remind him of this message: “Don’t go through life so fast that someone has to throw a brick at you to get your attention!”

God whispers in our souls and speaks to our hearts. Sometimes when we don’t have time to listen, He has to throw a brick at us. It’s our choice to listen or not.

Thoughts for the Day:

If God had a refrigerator, your picture would be on it.
If He had a wallet, your photo would be in it.
He sends you flowers every spring.
He sends you a sunrise every morning.

God didn’t promise days without pain, laughter without sorrow, sun without rain, but He did promise strength for the day, comfort for the tears, and light for the way.

If God brings you to it, He will bring you through it.

Keep the faith and keep a smile — Life is beautiful.

gil howe
Have a wonderful week.

UpLifts – Honor Thy Mother

Honor Thy MotherLearning to honor our parents is so important that God made it a part of the Ten Commandments. If one cannot honor earthly parents who he can see, how can he honor heavenly parents that he can’t see? We well know how Jesus honored His father throughout His life, but what of the Savior’s relationship with His mother? How did He treat her? Here’s the story:

At the age of twelve, Jesus traveled with His family from Nazareth to Jerusalem for one of the biggest celebrations of the year, the feast of the Passover. As this feast concluded and the tens of thousands of pilgrims started for home, Joseph and Mary did likewise joining with the company in traveling north out of Jerusalem about a day’s journey. They had supposed that Jesus was somewhere in the caravan. But at day’s end when they went looking for Him, they soon discovered He was not there; Jesus was nowhere to be found. Can you imagine Joseph and Mary’s feelings? ‘Oh dear, we’ve lost the Son of God!’

They went back a day’s journey to Jerusalem, and after three days found Him sitting in the Temple teaching. They were, as you can imagine, justifiably distraught. “… Son,” Mary says, “why hast thou thus dealt with us? …” (Luke 2:48) There’s no mistaking the chiding in her voice.

“… How is it that ye sought me?” Jesus replies. “Know [wist] ye not that I must be about my Father’s business?” (Luke 2:49)

It’s interesting that the scripture records that Joseph and Mary did not understand what He meant by that statement.

Now look at this. We have here a most unique situation. Probably for the first time in history, we actually do have a child who is in all ways smarter than His parents. He is the most intelligent being on the planet, capable, if you will, of governing the kingdom of the Jews if He were simply old enough. So how is He going to react toward His parents? He could have said, “I know what I’m doing; stop treating me like a child.” Or He could have said something like this: “Dad, mom, sit down before you hurt yourself.” Or He could have acted in any number of inappropriate ways toward His parents, but He didn’t.

Listen to what the scriptural record says. “… he went down with them, and came to Nazareth, and was subject unto them: …” (Luke 2:51)

Now Jesus gave the law, “Honour thy Father and [thy] Mother: …” (Exodus 20:12) and when His mortal test came, He fulfilled that law perfectly. It is well to note — consider this — It is well to note that He honored His earthly parents not necessarily because they earned it, but because it was His duty.

Now hear me: It is just as much a commandment for children to honor their parents as it is for parents to teach the Gospel to their children. To honor our parents is to honor God. After all, children, it was He who called them to their position, not you.

We hope that your mother has the most wonderful Mothers’ Day ever!

Based on Luke 2 and thanks to Glenn Rawson.

UpLifts – To A Happy Life

UpLifts
Remember those who have fallen to make you free. Have a beneficial Memorial Day!

One should prevent himself from mind pollution as it is one of the worst kind of pollution.

When was the last time you weeded your spiritual garden? Brandon Conder

It isn’t enough to talk about peace.
One must believe it.
It isn’t enough to believe in it.
One must work at it. — Eleanor Roosevelt

21 Keys to a Happy Life:

Compliment three people everyday.

Watch a sunrise.

Be the first to say “Hello.”

Live beneath your means.

Treat everyone as you want to be treated.

Never give up on anybody; miracles happen.

Forget being like the Jones’s.

Remember someone’s name.

Pray not for things, but for wisdom and courage.

Be tough-minded, but tender-hearted.

Be kinder than you have to be.

Don’t forget that a person’s greatest emotional need is to
be appreciated.

Keep your promises.

Learn to show cheerfulness even when you don’t feel it.

Remember that overnight success usually takes 15 years.

Leave everything better than you found it.

Remember that winners do what losers don’t want to do.

When you arrive at your job in the morning, let the first
thing you say brighten everyone’s day.

Don’t rain on other people’s parades.

Don’t waste an opportunity to tell someone you love them.

Keep some things to yourself and don’t promote havoc by
backstabbing people you love.

Take care of YOU!

Have a great week and remember it will be good if you make it so.

Thoughts For Life by: Gil Howe
If you can’t see the bright side then polish the dull side.

My Slanted Philosophy

Simple Thoughts:

“You have enemies? Good! It means you’ve stood up for something at least once in your life.” — Gilbert Howe
“Energy will do anything that can be done in this world.” –Goethe
“If you were going to die soon and had only one phone call you could make, who would you call and what would you say? And why are you waiting?” –Stephen Levine

Above all, try to be brave:

“Courage is the ladder on which all other virtues mount.” — Clare Booth Luce
“Wealth lost – something lost; Honor lost – much lost; Courage lost – all lost.” –German proverb
“Courage is the most important of all virtues, because without it we can’t practice any other virtue with consistency.” –Maya Angelou

My Slanted Philosophy:

BEAUTY TIPS – FOR BOTH SEXES!
For attractive lips, speak words of kindness.
For lovely eyes, seek out the good in people.
For a slim figure, share your food with the hungry.
For beautiful hair, let a child run their fingers through it once a day.
For poise, walk with the knowledge that you never walk alone.
People, even more than things, have to be restored, renewed, revived, reclaimed and redeemed; never throw out anyone.
Remember, if you ever need a helping hand, you’ll find one at the end of each of your arms.
As you grow older, you will discover that you have two hands, one for helping yourself, the second for helping others.

Happy Easter

The first Easter was the springtime of all history. It was a prophecy of new life, new hope, eternal growth and immortality. — Hugh B. Brown

“In the moonlit silence of that Near Eastern night, every acute pain, every heartfelt grief, every crushing wrong and human hurt experienced by every man, woman, and child in the human family was to be heaped upon his weary shoulders. But in such a moment, when someone might have said it to him, he rather says to us, ‘Let not your heart be troubled, neither let it be afraid.'” John 14:27.

Abundance

The Ancient Indian text, the Upanishads, speaks wisely of wealth: “He took abundance, from abundance and abundance remained.

Whereas economics in the West is ruled by a zero-sum rule, where money lost is forever lost and every penny has to be hard-earned, the Eastern perspective is different.

Whilst Western Economics is based on financial value, Eastern Economics is based on a deeper sense of value.

Furthermore, Western perspectives on wealth are based on financial aquisition, whilst Eastern values are based on contribution.

It is often beneficial to redefine our core-beliefs. We need to realise that there is enough in the world for us all and to shift our focus onto giving and not acquiring.

This realisiation of abundance is the foundation to feeling truly wealthy. It teaches us to focus on the real values of life.
——————-
“Peace will come and be maintained only through the triumph of the principles of peace, and by the consequent subjection of the enemies of peace, which are hatred, envy, ill-gotten gain, the exercise of unrighteous dominion of men. Yielding to these evils brings misery to the individual, unhappiness to the home, war among nations.” — David O. McKay

Thoughts For Life by: Gil Howe
If you can’t see the bright side then polish the dull side.